3 Myths Of Working With a Dietitian

April 3, 2018by Sally Hammer, RD
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All too often people hear the words registered dietitian or nutritionist and think “diet” or “weight loss”. While yes, weight management can be one aspect of health, our job is not only to work with those looking to lose weight. In honor of National Nutrition Month, I would like to clarify and dispel a few myths about what it means to work with a registered dietitian nutritionist.

Myth 1: Only people who are struggling with their weight should see a dietitian.Fact: Health and weight loss don’t necessarily mean the same thing. Everyone should have at least one annual check-up with a dietitian as you would with your dentist or primary care physician. Even the healthiest of eaters may be deficient in their own unique body’s needs. If left unaddressed, these nutritional deficiencies and imbalances can contribute to health issues like depression, anxiety, stomach pain, migraines, infertility, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis, cancer, Alzheimer’s and more. At Nourished Roots we focus on overall health, sometimes that includes weight loss but not always.

Myth 2: A dietitian just tells you what not to eat.

Fact: Food and nutrients are at the cornerstone of how I support my clients, but my priority is not to deprive you of the foods you love. Instead, I help you find ways to incorporate MORE foods that nourish your body and mind. We talk about foods you should ADD and why, ways to stay motivated, and how to knock down lifelong barriers in order to make lifestyle changes. I will coach you in areas beyond food including sleep, exercise, stress, mood, purpose, and fun! All of these important lifestyle elements fall in the dietitian’s wheelhouse because they affect nutrient levels, body composition, and disease prevention.

Myth 3: I will have to give up the foods I love forever.

Fact: Life is about balance. I don’t expect anyone to eat healthy 100% of the time, in fact, that would be unhealthy. While temporary food elimination diets can be helpful during the healing process, my goal is to help reincorporate all the foods you like to eat. There are very few instances such as celiac disease or autoimmune disease that foods may need to be removed permanently.  In these rare instances, my job is to support and guide you along the way so the journey is less overwhelming.

Sally Hammer, RD

Contact Sally

Nourished Roots Nutrition, LLC
P: (303) 209-8640
F: (303) 209-8482
nourishedrootsrd@gmail.com

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Tip of the Day

Often times we read the label and aren’t sure what we are looking at or what numbers are “good.” The best way to read a label is to first look at the serving size, which tells us the amount we would need to eat to equal the rest of the nutrients on the label. It is important to be aware of the serving size listed, because they range from 1.5 ounces for a favorite cookie to one-tenth of a pound for raw kale. Next read the Percent Daily Value on the label’s right side. The percentages in that column tell you what percentage of the recommended daily nutrients you get after eating one serving size. For example, if a serving size of your favorite snack is a whopping one pretzel, and the percent daily value for sodium is 41%, then each pretzel you eat gives you 41% of the recommended daily intake for sodium. Two pretzels gives you 82%. Three pretzels gives you 123% and so on.

A convenient way to look at percent daily values is to follow the 5-20 rule; 5% or less is considered low, while 20% or more is considered high.