3 Myths Of Working With a Dietitian

April 3, 2018by Sally Hammer, RD
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All too often people hear the words registered dietitian or nutritionist and think “diet” or “weight loss”. While yes, weight management can be one aspect of health, our job is not only to work with those looking to lose weight. In honor of National Nutrition Month, I would like to clarify and dispel a few myths about what it means to work with a registered dietitian nutritionist.

Myth 1: Only people who are struggling with their weight should see a dietitian.Fact: Health and weight loss don’t necessarily mean the same thing. Everyone should have at least one annual check-up with a dietitian as you would with your dentist or primary care physician. Even the healthiest of eaters may be deficient in their own unique body’s needs. If left unaddressed, these nutritional deficiencies and imbalances can contribute to health issues like depression, anxiety, stomach pain, migraines, infertility, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis, cancer, Alzheimer’s and more. At Nourished Roots we focus on overall health, sometimes that includes weight loss but not always.

Myth 2: A dietitian just tells you what not to eat.

Fact: Food and nutrients are at the cornerstone of how I support my clients, but my priority is not to deprive you of the foods you love. Instead, I help you find ways to incorporate MORE foods that nourish your body and mind. We talk about foods you should ADD and why, ways to stay motivated, and how to knock down lifelong barriers in order to make lifestyle changes. I will coach you in areas beyond food including sleep, exercise, stress, mood, purpose, and fun! All of these important lifestyle elements fall in the dietitian’s wheelhouse because they affect nutrient levels, body composition, and disease prevention.

Myth 3: I will have to give up the foods I love forever.

Fact: Life is about balance. I don’t expect anyone to eat healthy 100% of the time, in fact, that would be unhealthy. While temporary food elimination diets can be helpful during the healing process, my goal is to help reincorporate all the foods you like to eat. There are very few instances such as celiac disease or autoimmune disease that foods may need to be removed permanently.  In these rare instances, my job is to support and guide you along the way so the journey is less overwhelming.

Sally Hammer, RD

Contact Sally

Nourished Roots Nutrition, LLC
P: (303) 209-8640
F: (303) 209-8482
sally@nourishedrootsrd.com

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Tip of the Day

Gluten is a protein that is found in the grains wheat, rye, and barley. People living with celiac disease cannot eat gluten at all, even in the tiniest amounts, as it destroys their intestinal wall. This damage can prevent people from absorbing nutrients into their bodies. Other people may have non-celiac gluten sensitivity in which the body responds poorly to gluten. This can lead to gaps in the intestinal lining that allow larger food molecules and organisms like bacteria to leak into the bloodstream. Keep in mind a gluten-free diet is not necessarily a “weight loss” or “healthy” diet but can be therapeutic if indicated. There are many ways to test for celiac and gluten sensitivities; talk with Sally today for more information.